Mountain Dimension: 8.2 Mile Road and Trail Run at Eldorado Canyon State Park

ran up the road at the canyon base, then joined Fowler trail and doubled back up on the mountainside (see trail opposite the climber) …there were climbers on the rock today and the natural springs pool was packed with whooping, hollering, happy people escaping the heat…saw a lot of smiling people today.

Parked Eldorado Canyon corner store at Highway 93 and ran up Highway 170 through Eldorado Springs, a climber’s haven. Passed through town, past the sheer cliffs, and found Fowler Trail, running it back down to join back up with Highway 170 then back to start. The run was a little over 8 miles, about 50% road and 50% trail.

Now Available on Amazon Kindle

 

Now on Kindle for $7.19

product_thumbnail10 adaptable, customizable principles, and 7 training dimensions / evolutions that provide a broad and deep base for whatever you’re training for, in sport, arts, or work. This is a book that harmonizes training philosophy and practical, very simple takeaways for sustaining a consistent, building, growing training life. Cheers!

Run and Cut

To those who want to expose more muscle anatomy features through their skin:

Run.

And run more.

And when your body and mind tell you that you can eat extra-extra helpings because of your up-tempo, allow only extra-extra helpings from the fresh produce section.

Everything else, reduce to the high-yield, lean, non-processed versions, and eat less than usual.

Keep it up for at least a month and a half to see how this suits you.

IF YOU HAVE DIETARY GUIDELINES FOR ANY PHYSICAL OR MEDICAL CONDITION, OR NEED QUICK CALORIES TO KEEP HEALTHY AND FUNCTIONAL AT CRUCIAL TIMES, DISREGARD THESE SUGGESTIONS AS NEEDED. MODIFY ALL SUGGESTIONS ON THIS SITE TO SUIT YOUR PERSONAL PROFILE AS ARRIVED AT BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR PERSONAL PHYSICIAN AND OTHER HEALTH CARE ADVISERS WORKING AS A TEAM.

Embrace your least favorite element of training

the open sky

the open sky

If you delve into your least favored training areas, be it endurance, primary muscle strength, core strength, or application in sports, arts, or work, you will be raising the level of your foundational condition.

Let tedium become self-training in the gift of focus.

Let hardship be your elevator.

Let slowness be your path to thoroughness in preparation, and prevention.

Cheers!

Coastal trails and fair ocean breezes

 

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Veterans Day: 10.5 Mile Hike / Run on 4th of July Road and Trail (Indian Peaks Wilderness)

Enjoyed this Veterans Day and celebrated with much communing and attempted silence on this trail:

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Water

There are times you may not consciously realize that you need or want to renew your relationship to water in your training life.

Yet water and its properties are forces of nature that are part of your physical, mental, and if you will, spiritual being.

My Denver Half Marathon Half Rainbow

follow the path of movement

Take time to recover

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IMG_9549 download

Lake in a snowstorm

IMG_8277 IMG_8278 IMG_9048 cropped-img_0265.jpg IMG_0822 IMG_7101 icey lake

If you’ve read the book “Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness”…

..and you believe it will help others bridge gaps to a self-led, dauntless, consistent training life within their busy-tiring schedules…

Then please feel free to rate and review the book at one of the following venues!

Amazon

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Please don’t go …

I’m re-blogging Lyle Krahn’s essay and photograph of a ruffled grouse here on Farm Your Training Day because this illustrates to me a person who is highly attuned to his outdoor experience. Of course he is tuned into the nuances and shades of wonder: he’s an outdoor photographer, right? That is exactly why I reblog him here: each of us has the capacity to develop that greater level of attunement for all that is around us each time we are training outdoors, whether spotting natural wonders in the city, rurally, or in the wilds. Such attunement to the natural is a powerful motivator to return to outdoor training opportunities wherever we may be.

Thanks Lyle Krahn at Krahnpix for sharing his attuned perceptions in the blogosphere so we can take it beyond into the three plus dimensional world.

Best, Mike

Part II Internal: What Injury Did

copy-cropped-img_6270-e13762827104731.jpgAt launch, I was driven. I’d made the twisty-turning, detoured road to the trail head at about 10,600 feet. I started briskly, moving with intent to make a fast outing of it. I felt good. I was mildly irritated with the many distractions that had me coming out for an afternoon interval hike and run. Time is scarce these days.

I slipped, caught myself, and hurt my foot. See my previous post for that story and what it did externally.

Afterward, I was exasperated, scorning the decisions of fate.

Then I asked myself: what am I so attached to that I am upset about this?

As I tenderly hiked and occasionally ran along another six miles, I thought about that.

Is being “driven” healthy? Slaves are driven. Oxen are driven. Unloved horses are driven.

And yet, I’d been driving myself.

The injury stopped that with punctuation.

I was attached to ownership of myself, my day, my training, my business, my goals, my aspirations, and my expectations. All mine in Me-Myself-and-I-Ville. Forget my context, my purposes, what I was doing all of this for, and what I have dedicated myself to that is beyond me.

Yes. Subtly through growing impatience with delay after delay getting out there, I became more the slave driver. The Owner of everything. The hard-to-please judge of every little thing and how it was going. I allowed frustration to turn my day into a driven drought.

Then I hurt my foot and arrived at what I needed to do.

Let go and move, hike, and run free.

Part I Externals: Changing plans and unexpected injury outcomes

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Chicago Lakes Trail

Had originally planned a 10 mile trail race in Oregon in November with plans of moving to that beautiful state. Alas, negotiations and logistics did not align. I’d lined up training trail runs here in the Rockies as preparation. On one of those the other day, I injured my foot in a strange way I’ll talk about more.

The upshot of these developments: I am searching out a new race that seems right.

The injury to my foot the other day was soft tissue, but I’m beginning to believe that it *may* have an unexpected benefit. What happened? I was running-hiking a section of trail that was sandy and gravelly. My Merrell Barefoots are great on rocks, but on gritty granite slough, they slid. I was going down hard, then caught myself by instinctively jamming my shoe down at the ball of the foot, I was able to slow myself when it caught a sharp rock. I went down in slow-mo, with my toes bending so radically back I thought they would break off.

At the same time, the ball of my foot got the sharp end of the rock. Slow down I did, but felt a wet feeling inside my foot. I thought I may be bleeding. I checked my shoe for a puncture hole, but it held. I looked at my foot. Red and puffy. I put the shoe back on and continued on the theory that more circulation in and out would be a good thing.

Bruising, pain, and increased swelling did come. Yet something else did too.

The way my foot bent over, it felt like it actually opened up the tight joints of my toes and foot where I had a previous neuroma (nerve cyst) from too-tight boots long ago. The bones had rubbed on the nerves, irritating them and causing sharp foot pain Well, the wide toe-boxed barefoot shoes had been helping correct that, together with lots of foot stretching and exercise. But a sense of impingement had remained. After the injury, it feels gone. After it heals, if it scars inside, it may get worse. Or better. Perhaps tendons and ligaments were stretched out in beneficial ways. Here’s hoping.

Next, in Part 2 of this topic I want to talk about another unintended injury outcome.

7-mile hike and run on Chicago Lakes Trail

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This hike started out with running intervals. On one of those I lost footing on a gravelly down slope. I nailed my barefoot running shoe on a sharp, fixed rock trying to catch myself. It bruised my foot good. I’m grateful that is all it did.

For our magenta flower lovers.

For our magenta flower lovers.

IMG_7935IMG_7961I started at 10,600 feet at Echo Lake. I turned around at mile 3.5 to make a 7 mile run-hike. Below is my foot:

it was already ugly.

it was already ugly.

Fueling, Hydration, and Management of Forces Training Dimension: Follow-Up Post

surivivor of heat

Policy on Heat Injury: Prevention, Early Detection of precursors, Awareness, Quick Response. If it happens to you once, as it did to me 21 years ago, you will want to adopt another policy. No Repeats! Adaptive Training has 7 dimensions, and one of them is Forces Training. Forces Training is about intentionally encountering the natural forces, physics, energies, and elements of our training, sport, art, or work environments under controlled conditions for the purpose of acclimation, adaptation, increased capacity, and performance.

This post follows up on the last post, “When a Run Is Not a Run,” thanks to a question from Simone, whose blog is at http://meltdowntoironman.com/ and whose training targets the 2014 IMOZ or Iron Man Down Under. I was laughing as I wrote this because I’m betting Simone knows more about this than I do, but here is my expanded answer anyway. Anyone have wisdom to add? Please chime in.

There are excellent multi-sport resources for fueling and hydration. I’m posting those below. After that, I post my own suggested lessons-learned from the summer weight-bearing running and hiking perspective.

Professional Multi-Sport Fueling:

Master Race Day Nutrition:
http://www.ironman.com/triathlon-news/articles/2013/06/race-day-fueling.aspx#axzz2aAEqlXGN

How the Pros Hydrated At The Hawaii Iron Man:
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2011/10/nutrition/how-the-pros-hydrated-at-the-hawaii-ironman_41584

Fueling for Open Water Swimming (underlying science & practical detail included by USA Swimming):
http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/b9df2f1a-cf51-411d-b50d-76aaae75b9ae/Nutrition%20Strategies%20for%20Open%20Water.pdf

Our fellow WordPressers you may already know have lots of practical posts on the swim:
http://waterbloggedtriathlete.com/

http://owswimming.com/

My running hydration lessons learned:

1. Hydrate with electrolytes;
2. sipping not gulping;
3. steady sipping;
4. steady nutrition bearing in mind your temps, climbs, and humidity as they will impact your calorie burn rate (your thermostat and cooling system needs fuel to work efficiently);
5. seek cooling opportunities during runs, i.e. shade, cool presses, ice to rub on your head, whatever’s legal, efficient, and doesn’t overly distract you;
6. use an SPF rated, moisture wicking hat if allowed;
7. use proven moisture wicking training wear (in my book I cite research that such garments have a micro-wind tunnel effect surrounding the skin);
8. if thirsty, you’re already dehydrated, so sip at first sign your mouth feels dry, and boost frequency;
9. recognize climbs or changes in running surface resistance may boost your need for replacement fluid;
10. Have a plan and method for hydration, fueling, transition and practice / perfect them during training and races;
11. Occasionally train yourself for short intervals without adequate nutrition and hydration in arduous conditions to practice adapting to unexpected circumstances, practice distinguishing signs of trouble in yourself early, and to become a more perceptive self-trainer. KEEP THESE TRAINING SESSIONS SHORTER THAN THE NORMAL TRAINING SESSION — you don’t want “authentic battle damage” in training, BUT you do want to very gradually increase your capacity and tolerance for hardship; unexpected snafus, changes in conditions using intervals. Also practice your remedial counter-measures during these sessions, and gauge their effectiveness, try different salves, etc. WARNING: GET YOUR PHYSICIAN’S CLEARANCE TO TRY THIS, AND TO WHAT EXTENT.
12. If you show symptoms of dehydration (thirst, urine darker than a light yellow) boost your continual sipping of electrolyte fortified fluids, redouble your focus on efficient form in your sport; seek cooling opportunities (shade etc.); and be sure you’re breathing as efficiently as possible. Watch for symptoms of heat injury developing (cramps, exhaustion, or stroke), which may be found here:

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/survivalist/2013/07/survival-medicine-signs-and-field-treatments-heat-illnesses
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heat-stroke/DS01025/DSECTION=symptoms

There are myriad forces, elements, factors, and related circumstances you may encounter to modify your sport, art, work, race, event, expedition, or training day: heat, cold, wind, rain, humidity, pressure, altitude, lack of shade, UV rays, reflection, water, fire, disaster, weather, lightening, mud, bugs, animals, inclines, navigation errors, forgotten supplies, contaminated supplies, and more.

Adaptive Forces, Movement with Forces, and Management of Forces training intentionally encounters these elements and natural forces in controlled conditions as primary and secondary training factors to reduce their impact on the outcome of your effort, and if possible, to find ways that these can help you become better. A more detailed, long treatment of this customizable training dimension is an entire chapter in my book Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness.

Ethics Excellence in Athleticism

What's not to love about this?

Honor system on the trail.

Some athlete out there found this key, wrote up a note, and stuck it on the fence. It’s been there a while. Which means many a mountain biker, runner, or walker has left it in peace. This gleaming key of honor shows what is possible in human relations, and when children are with us, they see these examples. If a person can be trusted to trouble themselves with a small thing like this key, perhaps the next test will be easier to pass.

What freedom there is for any one whose value is vested in what they give, give back, gratefully receive, and share.

Run, Hike, & Walk for the Sky

Reflections in the Sky

Reflections in the Sky: Often we walk, hike, or run for feel of the road, the passing sights, the way our bodies change. All good. Yet sometimes it’s all about the sky.

7.55 Hike with Sprint Intervals with a fellow Writer…

On Walker Loop Trail, he whose laziness left his i-Phone in that little top pocket of his Camelback(TM) found rescue in Hiking-to-Healthy’s blog, who is one of you: the diligent, the excellers, the mountain movers who visit this blog and make it real…

We worked in some boulder scrambles, and each used a fallen pine tree trunk as a power lifting prop. We counted ourselves successful just to budge it several inches off the slope. The oxygen debt from sprinting on a mountain grade was humbling in a way that made one-minute’s recovery seem to slow down in time.

Here’s one of several shots from Hiking-to-Healthy’s earlier and thorough photo-journal capture of Walker Loop Trail:

Click on this and you’ll hyperspace to Hiking-to-Healthy’s blog, the illustrious Rocky Mountain hiking team whose trail and summit journals are some of the highest quality on the net.

Approval Screen from Lulu.com: Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

You have approved your book, Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness, for distribution, and it is being entered into the database of the largest US book wholesaler.

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Windows in the Sky Symbolize Promise

photo(4)photo(3)With outdoor training of any type, you get to be in the elements. Yesterday, these ionized the air and gave a gift of raindrops.

Ten Principles, Seven Dimensions

Make a sea-change in your training life approach, and reach for the sky:

sky shadowed light

Internalize the Ten Principles, Train the Seven Dimensions, and Live a Sustainably Free Training Life for the Long Run.

Barr Trail: 5.64 Mi. on the Path to Pike’s Peak

Barr Trail: 5.64 MI on the Path to Pike's Peak

Pictured is a lower segment of Barr Trail, the route to Pike’s Peak. It is over 12 miles long and gains 7,300 feet to the summit.

Plans hit a snag, and I arrived quite late, about 1:00 PM instead of the wee morning hours. There were also wildfires to the NW of Colorado Springs, with some related traffic along the interstate, however, the smoke wasn’t too bad.

Ran 5.64 miles in Merrell Barefoots and turned around as thunder clouds converged over Pike’s peak and the trail ahead. Here’s a link to a short clip (which may be “unavailable” for a short time as I’ve just set-up the account):

http://youtu.be/PNXjNf3_n5s

Will return one early morning soon to gain Barr Camp halfway up and the goal of a 14 miler. Debating whether to use the Barefoots the whole way or put on a different trail runner. There are not that many boulders to step up on this trail and the Merrells excel at that. Trails were well built with mostly crushed granite, dirt, occasional stairs and boulders.