Water

There are times you may not consciously realize that you need or want to renew your relationship to water in your training life.

Yet water and its properties are forces of nature that are part of your physical, mental, and if you will, spiritual being.

My Denver Half Marathon Half Rainbow

follow the path of movement

Take time to recover

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Lake in a snowstorm

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If you’ve read the book “Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness”…

..and you believe it will help others bridge gaps to a self-led, dauntless, consistent training life within their busy-tiring schedules…

Then please feel free to rate and review the book at one of the following venues!

Amazon

iTunes (iBookstore app download)

Barnes & Noble

Lulu.com

 

Adaptive Saturday: Three-100-Flood Labor-Mayweather

I did not expect the unexpected on Saturday. That’s good or else it wouldn’t be called unexpected. Expectations did not fail, they changed. However, adapting prevailed.

I’d planned a 5-7 mile run depending on how my foot felt. My friend and neighbor (who has been very busy lately) happened to be running at the same time. It was good to catch up, and to have someone else to share a cadence with on the road. We didn’t say much, just our feet. My friend’s ankle limits his running, a result of pounding from basketball. After a brief talk about that, and some talk about Eastern medicine approaches, I ran his run with him for three miles. I could run again later, and do a double. It was no problem for me. Waving him off and running further would have risked discouraging future runs together, so I ran in with him. My neighbor invited me to the Mayweather-Alvarez fight later in the evening. I said yes, and we parted ways.

I went inside, and focused on the heaviest kettle bells for 100 slow, near continuous movements (squat / dead lifts / rows / shrugs / incline presses).

After the run I had intended to spend the morning working on my current writing project, study my NSCA strength conditioning materials, and watch the thunderheads build over Colorado. Then I thought of my brother-in-law’s brother, whose basement had been flooded in the foothill community he lives in.

I put in a call. He was tearing soaked carpet out of a walkout basement. Nice. As I spoke to him I watched a huge thunderhead building over the mountains in his direction.¬† Phoning a person whose basement has been flooded to say, “Hey, how’s it going, let’s get together sometime,” is shallow to someone in deeper waters, so it was not long before I was driving down a rural country road toward the mountains, toting water remediation stuff I got from Lowes and my garage. It was an opportunity to listen to a U2 CD I got at a garage sale and drive new roads.

It also became a physical labor opportunity for conditioning. Here were some movements one doesn’t get to do every day. Squeegy work, water vacuuming, more carpet removal, baseboard prying, movement of irregular, heavy items, fan assembly, including a Precor treadmill, box hauling, and dumping water vac containers. After 3 hours of that, I realized that opportunities for exercise will arise under many circumstances helping people with physical burdens.

Later it was Pho Vietnamese soup with my family, and we all puzzled over the question of MSG, what had the least of it, and how to avoid it in the future when we wanted to go out.

The Mayweather fight was excellent as was the good company and conversation at my neighbor’s house. Observing Mayweather’s boxing mastery was a beautiful thing to behold. His humor came out a couple of times too. Without destroying his opponent physically, he mastered the fight in every way. His defense was subtle, swift, and sapped his opponent’s energy. His jab was a granite blur. His combinations were carefully timed, highly accurate, and powerful. His larger and younger opponent had not trained as hard or as long to be a master of the sweet science. Mayweather had, and it showed. On the other had, Mayweather’s team had forced a catch-weight regulation on Alvarez that had Alvarez dropping and gaining weight again swiftly before the fight. It may have affected Alvarez adversely to undergo such a fluctuation. Asked about it, Mayweather’s team chalked it up to the art of war.

An interesting fact: Mayweather was accompanied to the ring by rapper Lil Wayne and singer Justin Bieber. Psychological warfare, no doubt, meant to distract, or maybe feign excessive preoccupation with fame. If so, Mayweather’s training was definitely not distracted by fame.

Don’t Give Up

Paula Cole and Peter Gabriel put this message to song so beautifully:

For all who train, race, compete, and more importantly, love.

Don’t give up is just another way of saying “I love you,” and love is life’s truth and meaning.

 

For more of Paula Cole’s heart reviving music, see:

http://paulacole.com/home

For Peter Gabriel:

http://petergabriel.com/

 

Short on Time Blocs: 2-Run or not 2-Run? Do a Double Day

You awaken with enough time one morning to run a short run but want to run longer. Your calendar balks.

Should you run 2-runs today? One early, and one later to experience that longer endurance experience, and add some mileage to your body’s training base?

If you are cleared to run for fitness and sport, why not, so long as you are not over-training in the larger context of your training days.

This piece at Runner’s World goes into some detail about the benefits of “doubling.” And Jeff Galloway chimes in here.

And this is not only true for running. Other training modes may be mixed, matched, and doubled. Again, don’t over-train, but do adapt and excel. The experience boosts training and performance confidence, in part because few people make room to train twice in a day, or few seize the intervals as discussed in the ‘Interval Farming’ chapter in Farm Your Training Day.

Write in, comment, or, write a guest piece for my blog about how you leverage a “daily double” into your training life from time to time. Thanks for dropping in!

 

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Early

and

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Later on…

Combatting Loneliness By Training Life

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Loneliness does not discriminate. Probably everyone knows what kind of life events, states of being, and physical burdens correlate with it. Whatever isolation and loneliness comes from, those who suffer from it know why solitary confinement is one of the worst punishments prisons dole out.

A training life can move you out of the lonely place into a new life.

Growing your own training life from the ground up will lead you into short, manageable social interactions that begin slowly and gently to drain away the loneliness with each outing. You’ll have time to think, to hold problems up to the sun in your mind and heart, and to subject them to the light that dawns as you move.

The sunshine can boost you up some more.

Start simple: a walk or hike. Go to a nearby running track, a trail you know, or a park with long sidewalk pathways along a lake or river. Or just make the city blocks in a familiar area your training scape.

It is training, and retraining your brain, nerves, muscles, and body chemistry simply to get out and move in the outdoors. So much happens when you do this, there is an automatic element to outdoor outings.

Dress in what’s comfortable, do what you need to do to feel comfortable to get out the door. Then soak up the world’s outdoor riches as you journey.

Part II Internal: What Injury Did

copy-cropped-img_6270-e13762827104731.jpgAt launch, I was driven. I’d made the twisty-turning, detoured road to the trail head at about 10,600 feet. I started briskly, moving with intent to make a fast outing of it. I felt good. I was mildly irritated with the many distractions that had me coming out for an afternoon interval hike and run. Time is scarce these days.

I slipped, caught myself, and hurt my foot. See my previous post for that story and what it did externally.

Afterward, I was exasperated, scorning the decisions of fate.

Then I asked myself: what am I so attached to that I am upset about this?

As I tenderly hiked and occasionally ran along another six miles, I thought about that.

Is being “driven” healthy? Slaves are driven. Oxen are driven. Unloved horses are driven.

And yet, I’d been driving myself.

The injury stopped that with punctuation.

I was attached to ownership of myself, my day, my training, my business, my goals, my aspirations, and my expectations. All mine in Me-Myself-and-I-Ville. Forget my context, my purposes, what I was doing all of this for, and what I have dedicated myself to that is beyond me.

Yes. Subtly through growing impatience with delay after delay getting out there, I became more the slave driver. The Owner of everything. The hard-to-please judge of every little thing and how it was going. I allowed frustration to turn my day into a driven drought.

Then I hurt my foot and arrived at what I needed to do.

Let go and move, hike, and run free.

Part I Externals: Changing plans and unexpected injury outcomes

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Chicago Lakes Trail

Had originally planned a 10 mile trail race in Oregon in November with plans of moving to that beautiful state. Alas, negotiations and logistics did not align. I’d lined up training trail runs here in the Rockies as preparation. On one of those the other day, I injured my foot in a strange way I’ll talk about more.

The upshot of these developments: I am searching out a new race that seems right.

The injury to my foot the other day was soft tissue, but I’m beginning to believe that it *may* have an unexpected benefit. What happened? I was running-hiking a section of trail that was sandy and gravelly. My Merrell Barefoots are great on rocks, but on gritty granite slough, they slid. I was going down hard, then caught myself by instinctively jamming my shoe down at the ball of the foot, I was able to slow myself when it caught a sharp rock. I went down in slow-mo, with my toes bending so radically back I thought they would break off.

At the same time, the ball of my foot got the sharp end of the rock. Slow down I did, but felt a wet feeling inside my foot. I thought I may be bleeding. I checked my shoe for a puncture hole, but it held. I looked at my foot. Red and puffy. I put the shoe back on and continued on the theory that more circulation in and out would be a good thing.

Bruising, pain, and increased swelling did come. Yet something else did too.

The way my foot bent over, it felt like it actually opened up the tight joints of my toes and foot where I had a previous neuroma (nerve cyst) from too-tight boots long ago. The bones had rubbed on the nerves, irritating them and causing sharp foot pain Well, the wide toe-boxed barefoot shoes had been helping correct that, together with lots of foot stretching and exercise. But a sense of impingement had remained. After the injury, it feels gone. After it heals, if it scars inside, it may get worse. Or better. Perhaps tendons and ligaments were stretched out in beneficial ways. Here’s hoping.

Next, in Part 2 of this topic I want to talk about another unintended injury outcome.

Handling Victory and Defeat with Grace

If in our hearts we thoroughly prepare for lifelong grace after victory or defeat, neither victory or defeat can undo us.

7-mile hike and run on Chicago Lakes Trail

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This hike started out with running intervals. On one of those I lost footing on a gravelly down slope. I nailed my barefoot running shoe on a sharp, fixed rock trying to catch myself. It bruised my foot good. I’m grateful that is all it did.

For our magenta flower lovers.

For our magenta flower lovers.

IMG_7935IMG_7961I started at 10,600 feet at Echo Lake. I turned around at mile 3.5 to make a 7 mile run-hike. Below is my foot:

it was already ugly.

it was already ugly.

Five Rounds with the Heavy Bag

Yesterday’s training in the Mind-Body-Sport dimension.

Continuous punching is key. Stay moving in between rounds. For progressions, increase punching rate, power, intensity, speed throughout rounds. This gradually warms the joints and muscles, taking more impact as you go. If you don’t know how to punch, boxing gyms are good about teaching fundamentals.

Wrap the hands well to support wrists and cushion the bones of the hand. Snug, not circulation-cutting. The wraps I have are dummy-proof, with text on them saying “this side down,” a thumb loop, and self-secured with Velcro (TM). Put heavy bag or other striking gloves on, set your timer and have at it.

Today is Mountain. The plan is interval hiking-running. Will bring a camera and record the high points. Let me know with comments if you prefer detailed trip reports, or just highlights.

CLEAR YOUR READINESS FOR THIS AND ALL OTHER EXERCISES WITH YOUR PHYSICIAN. SEE THE LEGAL STUFFING PAGE VIA THE LINK ABOVE.

Overview and Table of Contents: Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

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Overview and Preview as Seen at iBookstore, Lulu.com, Barnes and Noble, and Amazon (with some formatting changes here).
Overview
Adaptive fitness doesn’t revolve around someone else’s contract, facility, and schedule.

With this guide, you can take ownership of your physical training life and leave behind co-dependence on unsustainable, packaged dieting and fitness hype.

Here you will learn ten principles to help you rewire yourself to train adaptively, more consistently, and thoroughly. Seven training dimensions encourage you to train often, in more places, with more choices.

Table of Contents

Introduction ………………………………………………………………………. vii
Organization, Content, and Safety Notice ………………………………..ix

Part I. Principles of Adaptive Training ………………… 1

Chapter 1. The Training Day Principle ……………………………………3
Chapter 2. Interval Farming Principle ……………………………………..7
Chapter 3. Adaptive Journal Principle ……………………………………40
Chapter 4. The Working Principle ………………………………………..45
Chapter 5. The Gradualism Principle …………………………………….60
Chapter 6. Windfall Principle ………………………………………………71
Chapter 7. Attunement Principle …………………………………………. 74
Chapter 8. Adaptive Eating, Drinking, and Sleeping Principles….90
Chapter 9. Objective Principle: Identify & Excel in Your Sport,
Art, and Work …………………………………………………. 107
Chapter 10. Navigation Principle …………………………………………. 111

Part II. The Seven Dimensions¬† of Adaptive Training …127

Chapter 11. Dimension One: Muscle …………………………………….130
Chapter 12. Mileage ………………………………………………………….. 155
Chapter 13. Mobility …………………………………………………………. 173
Chapter 14. Midsection + Core …………………………………………… 183
Chapter 15. Mountain ……………………………………………………….. 192
Chapter 16. Movement with Forces (MWF) …………………………..206
Chapter 17. The Seventh Dimension: Mind-Body Training via
Sport, Art, Work ………………………………………………254

Acknowledgements

Incoming! A dust storm then T-storm with Tornado Warnings Interrupts Hike & Bouldering

One

One: A dust storm hits Boulder, Colorado?

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Two: Closer…

Three

Three: Advancing

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Four: Just before blowing into the forests and foothills of the Flatirons over Boulder, CO.

Five

Five: the storm cloud exploded upward after the dust storm arrived at the Flatirons…

3.6 Twilight Rainy Running Interval Fit Into Family Camping Debut

Twilight Running in the Forest

Twilight Running in the Forest

Fitting In

Fitting In

Setting

Setting

Terrain: Mountain

Elevation: 10,000 Feet

Distance: 3.6 Miles

Time: Twilight after Sundown

Conditions: Rainy

Temps: 40’s Fahrenheit.

Priority: Last. Family-firsts came first, and therein, this writer’s personal, adaptive training purpose-growth.

Special Occasions: First family camp-out with our girl, first-time fishing with her, first-time rainy camp-out, first-time camp-out for dog, and first tent construction and fire build with my daughter, and first tent take down in the rain with my better half. Joyous experiences.

Tag-Team Family Training Principle: Covered for my spouse, enabling her time to hike and run without distraction, a rarity for her. In a setting away from home (absent the familiar rationales) one who writes about accessible training for others, for self, and tests these principles, faces own selfishness. The practice emerges with greater focus away from home, evangelized by reflection in a tent, and by a fire, symbolizing the burning away of my rationales.

Team Member Check: Ceded nutrition lead to spouse, whose professional vocational training, research, and intrinsic discipline better fills the nutritional knowledge role between us, as I pursue the adaptive personal fitness focus. Teams and their members share ownership. A family must choose teamwork, every member contributing, and every member respecting the others’ contributions. A dedicated zone of listening to the expertise and role, an area that calls us to expand this mutuality, and harmony.

All in all, a wonderful weekend, a wonderful place, and joy in the rain.

Fueling, Hydration, and Management of Forces Training Dimension: Follow-Up Post

surivivor of heat

Policy on Heat Injury: Prevention, Early Detection of precursors, Awareness, Quick Response. If it happens to you once, as it did to me 21 years ago, you will want to adopt another policy. No Repeats! Adaptive Training has 7 dimensions, and one of them is Forces Training. Forces Training is about intentionally encountering the natural forces, physics, energies, and elements of our training, sport, art, or work environments under controlled conditions for the purpose of acclimation, adaptation, increased capacity, and performance.

This post follows up on the last post, “When a Run Is Not a Run,” thanks to a question from Simone, whose blog is at http://meltdowntoironman.com/ and whose training targets the 2014 IMOZ or Iron Man Down Under. I was laughing as I wrote this because I’m betting Simone knows more about this than I do, but here is my expanded answer anyway. Anyone have wisdom to add? Please chime in.

There are excellent multi-sport resources for fueling and hydration. I’m posting those below. After that, I post my own suggested lessons-learned from the summer weight-bearing running and hiking perspective.

Professional Multi-Sport Fueling:

Master Race Day Nutrition:
http://www.ironman.com/triathlon-news/articles/2013/06/race-day-fueling.aspx#axzz2aAEqlXGN

How the Pros Hydrated At The Hawaii Iron Man:
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2011/10/nutrition/how-the-pros-hydrated-at-the-hawaii-ironman_41584

Fueling for Open Water Swimming (underlying science & practical detail included by USA Swimming):
http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/b9df2f1a-cf51-411d-b50d-76aaae75b9ae/Nutrition%20Strategies%20for%20Open%20Water.pdf

Our fellow WordPressers you may already know have lots of practical posts on the swim:
http://waterbloggedtriathlete.com/

http://owswimming.com/

My running hydration lessons learned:

1. Hydrate with electrolytes;
2. sipping not gulping;
3. steady sipping;
4. steady nutrition bearing in mind your temps, climbs, and humidity as they will impact your calorie burn rate (your thermostat and cooling system needs fuel to work efficiently);
5. seek cooling opportunities during runs, i.e. shade, cool presses, ice to rub on your head, whatever’s legal, efficient, and doesn’t overly distract you;
6. use an SPF rated, moisture wicking hat if allowed;
7. use proven moisture wicking training wear (in my book I cite research that such garments have a micro-wind tunnel effect surrounding the skin);
8. if thirsty, you’re already dehydrated, so sip at first sign your mouth feels dry, and boost frequency;
9. recognize climbs or changes in running surface resistance may boost your need for replacement fluid;
10. Have a plan and method for hydration, fueling, transition and practice / perfect them during training and races;
11. Occasionally train yourself for short intervals without adequate nutrition and hydration in arduous conditions to practice adapting to unexpected circumstances, practice distinguishing signs of trouble in yourself early, and to become a more perceptive self-trainer. KEEP THESE TRAINING SESSIONS SHORTER THAN THE NORMAL TRAINING SESSION — you don’t want “authentic battle damage” in training, BUT you do want to very gradually increase your capacity and tolerance for hardship; unexpected snafus, changes in conditions using intervals. Also practice your remedial counter-measures during these sessions, and gauge their effectiveness, try different salves, etc. WARNING: GET YOUR PHYSICIAN’S CLEARANCE TO TRY THIS, AND TO WHAT EXTENT.
12. If you show symptoms of dehydration (thirst, urine darker than a light yellow) boost your continual sipping of electrolyte fortified fluids, redouble your focus on efficient form in your sport; seek cooling opportunities (shade etc.); and be sure you’re breathing as efficiently as possible. Watch for symptoms of heat injury developing (cramps, exhaustion, or stroke), which may be found here:

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/survivalist/2013/07/survival-medicine-signs-and-field-treatments-heat-illnesses
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heat-stroke/DS01025/DSECTION=symptoms

There are myriad forces, elements, factors, and related circumstances you may encounter to modify your sport, art, work, race, event, expedition, or training day: heat, cold, wind, rain, humidity, pressure, altitude, lack of shade, UV rays, reflection, water, fire, disaster, weather, lightening, mud, bugs, animals, inclines, navigation errors, forgotten supplies, contaminated supplies, and more.

Adaptive Forces, Movement with Forces, and Management of Forces training intentionally encounters these elements and natural forces in controlled conditions as primary and secondary training factors to reduce their impact on the outcome of your effort, and if possible, to find ways that these can help you become better. A more detailed, long treatment of this customizable training dimension is an entire chapter in my book Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness.

Inner Runner, Inner Forgiver

There are reasons to run, and there is running for a reason. This breezy summer night the air was fresh of mountain and field, bracing and pure under the smile of a half moon’s glow. This was running for a reason.

The running surface was mostly asphalt, some road bed rock at the side, an occasional weedy dodge of a car, and a couple of rigid sidewalks. All in all 7.6 miles.

Running and allowing the gravity and other forces of the planet, solar system, galaxy, universe, the cosmos, and beyond, to act on me, to breathe in from the greatest wonders of all that is interrelated to the tiniest cellular worlds inside reminded me of a truth.

Running like this on country roads at night allows me to find peace enough to watch my thoughts emanate outward and reveal themselves, my memories, and my legends of others and self. My hubris under the glory of starlight is laughable. I turn and see the Big Dipper is a sign that I can be the biggest dip in the road.

What do I see? I see the truth, the truth that I am a sinner and that this truth, told honestly brings forgiveness from within my heart, tapping internally the light from the Beginning, the creative light that creates love and life from forgiveness. If I forgive concealing my wrongs, I stand in the yard of my being, shutting the inner light inside, squelching true light within closed doors. Worse, perhaps I then judge others to keep the diversion externally directed away from me and call it forgiveness, adding lie to lie.

Forgiveness from the front yard brings nothing from inside the home. Internal forgiveness brings truth and goodness from within as a gift and sacrifice, as a pearl to give to the forgiven one from the heart, or maybe a song of light, heard by the heart of the forgiven.

As I ran tonight, I realized that repentant heartbeats, sighs, and breathing are given to all of us to use to join the light within with the lights up on high, the warming around us, and the grand, glorious eternity of now, as universal gifts of forgiveness to all and to one. I would say it strongly: the purpose of repentance is to lead us to a greater forgiveness of others, to open the door opening the heart’s inner chamber for Light to become an endless river of peace.

For how is it we can fear one whom we love with the love of forgiveness from a heart that has known the gift of being forgiven that began with truthfulness about self?

How do we deal with Aging and Training?

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the ascents…

How do athletes deal with aging? Answer may differ for each of us.

Something helps me. Remembering what I’m training for besides the immediate feel, look, and function. Or besides the next race, competition, game, event, or expedition. I wanted to share this:

If I find myself running one day with a gait that looks like my knees and ankles have been tenderized with hammers, what will I then be training for? I will be training with the goal that every person who looks into my eyes finds the peaceful warrior’s ageless resolve.

Ethics Excellence in Athleticism

What's not to love about this?

Honor system on the trail.

Some athlete out there found this key, wrote up a note, and stuck it on the fence. It’s been there a while. Which means many a mountain biker, runner, or walker has left it in peace. This gleaming key of honor shows what is possible in human relations, and when children are with us, they see these examples. If a person can be trusted to trouble themselves with a small thing like this key, perhaps the next test will be easier to pass.

What freedom there is for any one whose value is vested in what they give, give back, gratefully receive, and share.

The Replacement

When I kick a habit I kick it now;

Unless I replace it with decision,

The kicking is for show.

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7.55 Hike with Sprint Intervals with a fellow Writer…

On Walker Loop Trail, he whose laziness left his i-Phone in that little top pocket of his Camelback(TM) found rescue in Hiking-to-Healthy’s blog, who is one of you: the diligent, the excellers, the mountain movers who visit this blog and make it real…

We worked in some boulder scrambles, and each used a fallen pine tree trunk as a power lifting prop. We counted ourselves successful just to budge it several inches off the slope. The oxygen debt from sprinting on a mountain grade was humbling in a way that made one-minute’s recovery seem to slow down in time.

Here’s one of several shots from Hiking-to-Healthy’s earlier and thorough photo-journal capture of Walker Loop Trail:

Click on this and you’ll hyperspace to Hiking-to-Healthy’s blog, the illustrious Rocky Mountain hiking team whose trail and summit journals are some of the highest quality on the net.