Movement with Forces: Vehicle Training (2:53)

Movement with Forces (inertia, velocity, momentum, gravity, etc.) training is one of 7 dimensions of training set out in my adaptive fitness book “Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness.”

Here, vehicle training is a form of Movement with Forces training. The purpose of this training is a functional encounter with one or more physical and energetic forces at once, not mere weight lifting primarily engaging gravity by loading joints from above. With vehicle training you can train as with a blocking sled on the football field, emphasize pushing the vehicle with calves; emphasize lunging the vehicle; emphasize a hack squat / backward walk by engaging the bumper with the lower back, grasping it from beneath and walking backward, pushing it. You can pull it from the tow hook as well as shown in the clip. Just be certain to stay clear of wheels and use a flat area in which the vehicle cannot roll away. You can also execute various levels of presses with the upper body. These exercises should be slow going. Let up after feeling a significant new challenge. Train muscle gradually over time.

With vehicle training, physical forces and properties undertaken include inertia, gravity, isometrics, friction, momentum, and velocity among others. The benefits of vehicle training include engagement of major muscle groups, affordability, accessibility, natural Vitamin D, and multiple force training of the body.

When you overcome the stationary resting force of the vehicle, and train your body with inertia / gravity. Momentum/Velocity: You cause the vehicle to have velocity, and momentum when you move it. Then, to stop it, you must overcome the vehicle’s Momentum/Velocity, returning it to its resting, inertial state. There is a point within your stopping the vehicle’s momentum that you meet with yielding isometric forces since the vehicle acts as a fixed object, i.e. you push on it but it is not moving with your force. Its momentum / velocity is clashing with your personal force, slowing the vehicle and reducing its velocity / momentum. When getting it going again from a stationary position, there is a moment of fixed isometric force your body feels.

WARNING: YOU MAY NOT BE READY FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING OF THIS KIND. IT REQUIRES COMMON SENSE PRECAUTION AFTER CONSULTATION WITH YOUR PHYSICIANS OR TRAINERS. DOING SUCH EXERCISES COULD CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH. IF NOT WILLING TO UNDERTAKE SUCH RISK, DO NOT DO ANY EXERCISES DEPICTED ON THIS CHANNEL. CLEAR ALL PLANNED PHYSICAL TRAINING WITH YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, PERSONAL PHYSICIAN, AND / OR SPORTS PHYSICIANS / COACHES / TRAINERS. DO VEHICLE TRAINING WITH 2 SPOTTERS, one to help you and the other to keep the vehicle path clear and the scene safe. IN A FLAT AREA WITH NO CHANCE THE VEHICLE WILL ROLL AWAY, AND STAY CLEAR OF WHEELS WHILE ENGAGING, PUSHING, AND PULLING THE VEHICLE. IF YOU FEEL THE VEHICLE’S TIRE CONTACT A FIXED OBJECT LIKE A CURB, LET OFF YOUR PUSHING FORCE TO AVOID BLOWING A JOINT. CLEAR THE WAY FOR THE WHEELS TO ROLL SMOOTHLY BEFORE PROCEEDING.

When a Run is Not a Run, But an Encounter with Physical and Energetic Forces and Conditions

Force of Heat

Force of Heat

Yesterday I did not hydrate to prepare for a run.

Yesterday I did not eat much at all.

Yesterday was not a running training day. And although I ran, I did not run.

At the height of the late day heat in the 90’s, in full sun, underfed for the day, and poorly hydrated, I strapped on a hydration system, downed a Gu (Trademarked name) and took off running. I had no distance or pace in mind. It wound up at 4.21 miles.

My sole goal was to encounter heat and full sun while feeling unprepared for my run. I had planned with the Gu shot, and the hydration system, for my own safety net after the halfway point. The Gu shot would kick in after about 20-30 minutes, and I would feel lousy for over half the exercise period.

During the run I purposely ran on several different surfaces, regular and irregular, to do something against my expectations. I ran on river rock, broken granite, asphalt, dirt, deep grass, groomed grass, concrete, and on a few mulch areas. The route was mostly flat with some subtle rises, but it was all in the open sun with no shade until the end stretch.

In the first 30 minutes of this run, I felt very hot. My skin felt hot, my head felt hot, the air felt hot, I was thirsty, and there was very little or no breeze. When I felt a little lightheaded at one point, I recognized it coinciding with that hollowed-out feeling of stomach emptiness during exertion without blood sugar. I slowed down to adapt to the energy drain, reduce heat build-up, yet still keep running by a purely technical definition, no matter how slowly. I began sipping water when I felt lightheaded to make this a training interval, not self-immolation.

When the Gu finally found my bloodstream I felt the boost and picked up my pace. My stomach emptiness eased, and I  found some tree cover for the last half-mile of my encounter with the heat and my own deprivation. I could have become a treehugger for shade.

Did I train? By someone else’s definition, perhaps not. But the definitions I set had to do with addressing obstacles I have run into before in my training life, not adopting someone else’s focus, but my own, in the present moment. By encountering and adapting to:

Heat

Hunger

Thirst

Finishing determination

and

my thoughts and feelings about it all…

..the goal was to train my mind to adapt to all factors and conditions to continue, not quit, and not fall to a heat injury. You see, long ago, I did reach dangerous temperatures while running hills in a 100 degrees-plus, humid, still forests of Virginia wearing pack, boots, helmet, and carrying a rifle. My temperature was 106.4 degrees Fahrenheit before a pugnacious young Staff Sergeant from San Diego pulled me down, and started pouring gallons of water over my head. He saved my life and I’ll always be indebted.

I do not recommend anyone else do this particular heat / hunger / thirst forces session. Perhaps you would never feel the need. I recommend training on full hydration; after adequate nutrition; being judicious about training times and types given your own personal, physical history, profile, needs, and objectives. In other words, a run is a run, a training run is a training run, but your intention in training, your focus can change the interval into something else.

For me, this was voluntarily facing a convergence of forces to train to adapt to them despite having fallen to them in the past. The purpose? To gradually increase capacity to deal should unexpectedly arduous conditions be imposed on me at some future time. Next time, I’ll go slightly further, and so on under similar conditions. This also trains mind and body to appreciate and stay aware of hydration, nutrition, and preparation. It also helps train my mind to adapt and function when those elements are lacking — to push the envelope back and retrain my body’s capacity to adapt, endure, and do so functionally.

Had I wanted to enjoy the feelings of a “run in the heat” I would have prepared properly for it and billed it as a run. A run it was not. A forces training day it was. So if you are a runner, always prepare. Always adapt with as much preparation as possible. You will train longer, with fewer interruptions, and less wear and tear on the body with excellent preparation.

Think of the many times you have said or read about someone having a “bad day” training. A low energy day. Preparation would likely solve a healthy percentage of those days. Adaptation, a survival and enhancement skill, is the follow-up to preparation when unpredictable things happen.

Train prepared friends!