Now Available on Amazon Kindle

 

Now on Kindle for $7.19

product_thumbnail10 adaptable, customizable principles, and 7 training dimensions / evolutions that provide a broad and deep base for whatever you’re training for, in sport, arts, or work. This is a book that harmonizes training philosophy and practical, very simple takeaways for sustaining a consistent, building, growing training life. Cheers!

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Coastal trails and fair ocean breezes

 

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At Below Zero Soup’s a Hero

When it’s like this outside…
photo 1 photo 2 photo 3You Need Something Like This Inside…

photo 4

organic vegetable and chicken broth (whatever you prefer); sparing on the noodles; carrot, red onion slices earlier in the simmer; orange and red mild peppers and garlic mid-simmer; and cherry tomatoes plus milled flax seed and a can of organic unsalted black beans; spice as desired, I used sea salt; olive oil splash at the end…turned out nice! [DO FOLLOW YOUR OWN DIETARY RESTRICTIONS AND OMIT WHAT YOU AND YOUR DOC’S HAVE RULED OUT!]

Winter Training: Light and Heat

Clouds Take on Light and Heat

Clouds Take on Light and Heat

Many times we shrink from cold weather training because, well, it’s cold out there and we feel chilled, or we imagine what discomfort we will encounter in coldness.

However, like clouds, our water rich bodies transfer heat and light energy, even use them to make nutrients.

We generate heat. Movement circulates it, and enlivens us with it.

If I spend a few hours writing and editing on a winter afternoon, I often notice my hands are cool. If I go outside in the freezing temperatures layered-up to train or labor, when I come back in, for a good long while my hands are warm and very comfortable.

Veterans Day: 10.5 Mile Hike / Run on 4th of July Road and Trail (Indian Peaks Wilderness)

Enjoyed this Veterans Day and celebrated with much communing and attempted silence on this trail:

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If you’ve read the book “Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness”…

..and you believe it will help others bridge gaps to a self-led, dauntless, consistent training life within their busy-tiring schedules…

Then please feel free to rate and review the book at one of the following venues!

Amazon

iTunes (iBookstore app download)

Barnes & Noble

Lulu.com

 

Vancouver Boating, Bicycles & Rainy Walks / Colorado Eldorado Canyon Run & Rain Aftermath

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To catch up on my periodic journaling of training experiences:

Vancouver, BC. Be it known that I skipped the hotel fitness center in Vancouver BC, and opted for family whale watching, walks in the rain, and bicycling in the sunshine.

On the whale boat I could have sat the entire journey and monitored the Pacific waters for sea life. But I spent some wonderful time holding my child and working on fixing on distant, relatively fixed points to avoid symptoms of motion sickness as we motored over the waves to where the whales were spotted off the coast.

Going up to the boat’s viewing roof, I found that riding those waves in a rain coat afforded me a nice, standing core exercise trying to stay balanced on the boat, minimizing dependence on the rails.

Movement with Forces training came into play staying out in the rainy, windy sea weather and exposing myself to the wet cold for a time. Cold, wet sea weather is a force.

Another force encountered was the motion of moving in circles on my feet on the top deck relative to the boat’s forward, swell-riding motion. The circling was to scan the ocean’s surface for whales and other sea animals, while keeping balance, orientation, and trying to mitigate motion symptoms. This was a unique experience. I might have slogged through it, jetting along with the experience incidentally, and trying to avoid the elements as sources of discomfort instead of sources of mind-body training.

Instead I decided to consciously engage the ride as a crossing of training dimensions, and I thoroughly enjoyed it while witnessing the stunning beauty of the NW coasts and isles. Along with others I got to share ocean air and space with killer whales, humpbacks, sea lions, porpoises, and varied seabirds. The salt on the air, the relaxing of the boat’s fellow riders, and the graciousness of the husband-wife captain-naturalist team really enhanced our day.

Our walks in the rainy city gave us many chances to negotiate the architectural inclines, hilly city blocks, and wall tops as we used our feet to move through the concrete, glass, and steel mountains. The sea air blowing between them was a bonus. After much cool weather walking about, you can imagine that fish and chips, coffee, and hot chocolate called out to us a time or two. Let me also recommend the practice for parents of safely holding hands with your child in the city, and swinging him over the lines, manhole covers, sidewalk designs, and props found along the city course. I think switching sides and getting both arms in on the child swing is a good practice. Teaching city safety  and enjoyment awareness at the same time is a bonus. During these walks, sudden footraces are known to break out, too. Race you to that monument — to that hydrant — to that vent – to that tree…

Our bicycle outing was just plain fun in the sunshine viewing the mountains we hadn’t been able to see for the clouds for three days straight. And walking some sandy, shelly, mossy, and very clean inner beaches came with the cycling trip through Stanley Park.

We had no time to hit all the most advertised destinations, but we saved a list for another time if it comes available.

To counter the experience of sitting on planes, trains, and automobiles, I used the symmetrical carrying and lifting of luggage, treating it as if I were carrying kettlebells, and keeping the exercises with it closer-in and less conspicuous so as not to embarrass family too much. This included lunging it, squatting to lift it, shrugging it, variable one and two armed rows, curling it, shouldering it, and the like. Same with the carry on back pack. Luggage that I carry is often between 35 and 40 pounds, and serves nicely as a clunky kettle bell by the top handle. I also kick it up with my foot when putting it on wheels and pulling the handle out to pull it. Sitting in airport seats I am able to do wrist curls with my luggage, propping wrists on knees and grasping the top handle.

Trips can afford more than in my laziness I took advantage of.

Rocky Mountain Photo Journal: Seven Miles Dedicated to Snoopy’s Citadel

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Windows in the Sky Symbolize Promise

photo(4)photo(3)With outdoor training of any type, you get to be in the elements. Yesterday, these ionized the air and gave a gift of raindrops.

About Adaptive Fitness (Hint: One of the Principles is called Interval Farming)

Sept 2006 Aspen mixed forest ground0001Adaptive fitness means owning your physical training life and ending co-dependence on unsustainable, packaged dieting and fitness hype. Learn ten principles to help rewire yourself to train adaptively, consistently, and thoroughly for life. Seven training dimensions expand your training spaces. Spread the word to everyone who wants a sea change in their physical conditioning, sport, art, or work life…

Farm Your Training Day!

Now Available at Lulu.com: Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

It’s official. Click on the book cover icon at the upper right side of this screen, and you can go there. The E-book will be available in about one week. For now, it is print on demand, with some extra cost of production. I tried to set as reasonable a print price as possible considering all factors. You can also click here:

Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

Spring Rain Paints the Sky and Spring Training Calls

Spring Training

Spring Training

After sifting the manuscript for my upcoming book release, I felt as if I had sifted tons of sand. I picked out mossy twigs, broken bark pieces, and rocks from what seemed like ages of writing washed up from the tossed ocean of my mind, memory and experience.

There were also broken toy pieces buried in the sand; notions or ideas I had played with before that were too automatic, too obsolete, and poorly developed to include. I could not stare at them for too long, humbled by the fact that I had not finished constructing them in the past.

That work had to be done. In delaying publication to find and discard these ideas suffering from arrested development, it took the prospect of another person examining the manuscript one more time for me to cast aside some of these self-interested ideas. To my proofreader I am most grateful.

Soon, finally, I will have news of the final title, and where the book can be found.

I am grateful that Spring training is here.

Excellent Link for All Outdoor Athletes

The U.S. Search and Rescue Task Force website is a great resource for outdoor athletes, fitness enthusiasts, photographers, journeyers, naturalists, outdoors people, campers and more. Have a look:

U.S. SAR Task Force Site.

Back Country Observation Skills Can Help In Other Areas of Life

On my way to the mountains last Saturday morning I saw the alerts on the overhead smart signs: CHILD ABDUCTION. STAY TUNED TO LOCAL MEDIA. I wondered what I could do, hence the last post.

This morning, I wondered what else I could do and thought about how back country observation skills can help us not only choose better routes, be safer, spot refuge, and stay oriented to where we are, they can also make us better observers in other contexts and settings.

Here are some observation factors we can all practice and exercise in the back country that could also be used to help us spot facts that could timely help find a missing person, remember possible sites of interest for later search, and many other signs and relationships. This 20 example list is just a start:

1. Noting names or numbers of reference points for location and orientation, as in numbers of features on a ridge between to obvious high points. Or, the number of creek passages across a trail we’re on. Keeping numbers on time. And so on.

2. Seeing and remembering cover, refuges or hiding places that may serve to protect us if weather turns dramatically worse. Or, that may contain animals. Or, that may contain a person or persons!

3. Noting tracks. Variances in tracks, sizes of tracks, type of tracks (human, animal or vehicle).

4. Noticing changes in flora or grasses. Tamped down flora, broken stalks or branches. Obvious new or old pathways through grass, game trails, and permissive approaches to hiding places in the forest. Thick or thin forest.

5. Noticing litter, gear, garments, jewelry, and other personal items dropped or discarded. Noting their positions with relation to land forms and features such as precipices, water or thick forest.

6. Noticing spent cartridges, evidence of ax or knife usage and the age of these.

7. Learning to use the sense of smell combined with awareness of wind direction and patterns, and combined with stillness and listening.

8. Learning to listen carefully and identify remote noises: engines, engine types or sizes; stress on engines (uphill travel?) etc., thunder, blasting, aircraft, and so on.

9. Learning to be still and notice movements out of the ordinary in a scene or from a vista.

10. Learning to note and remember vehicles seen in parking areas, license plate origins, stickers, decals and even LP numbers in case they may become useful.

11. Learning the signs of wildlife predators, such as those shown on this excellent piece on mountain lions.

12. Learning to spot foolish behaviors in other back country travelers, especially if they’re leading kids into the back country.

13. Learning to observe, notice and check into things that are out of place, rather than ignoring them.

14. Periodically silencing one’s own movement and noise to listen up to everything around us.

15. Noticing slopes, their degrees, and their loads. Soil around rocks and boulders routinely erodes or softens enough that rocks break loose. Being aware of what’s above and being prepared to get out of the way is key. Same with snow loads, and the avalanche conditions as one would learn in avalanche safety courses to avoid death or disability by avalanche.

16. Noting weather changes and the timing of these.

17. Watching for remote lights in the dark, or reflections in the day or night.

18. Noting smoke, cinders by smell or sight, or recent burning by smell or sight.

19. Noticing land features in which it would be easy to get lost or lose personal items.

20. Listening for and distinguishing human sounds and voices from animal sounds in the forest. Some animals make sounds that resemble human voices sometimes, which can be kind of unnerving. Here is a site for learning animal sounds. It’s fascinating even if you never go out.

That’s all I have for now. By our observation skills we may one day save a life or protect someone from harm, including our loved ones or ourselves.

listen see file remember

We never know what good our observations may do.

Amber Alerts: TO: OUTDOOR TRAINERS, RUNNERS, ENTHUSIASTS, CLIMBERS, HIKERS, SKIERS, RUNNERS AND MORE

PLEASE PASS THIS ON. When it comes to keeping a lookout, outdoor fitness, sports and training enthusiasts cover lots of ground, terrain, streets and other paths. That’s why I’m re-posting and linking to information to become familiar with the Jessica Ridgeway case, and other recent attempted or active abduction facts so that more eyes and ears can expand the lookout beyond the limits of current searches.Below are descriptive facts on more than one case in the region.

Click here for continually updated blog on latest in authorities’ attempts to bring Jessica Ridgeway’s murderer to justice.

Also, here are links to relatively recent incidents of attempted or active child abductions together with descriptions of vehicles or persons where available. Any of the facts noted may lead to discoveries that could protect children and help law enforcement. One happened Monday in Cody, Wyoming and the FBI is studying that one for similarities.

Cody, Wyoming abduction: Arrested.

Arvada, Colorado attempts: royal blue sedan; link to story for composite sketch.

Iowa abuction: similar age, gender to Jessica. Active case over 2 months since disappearances.

Sheridan, Colorado attempted abduction of 2 year old in June. White van and see story for sketch of suspect.

You may find other attempted or active abduction stories by your own research. Be advised, children aren’t the only ones, in 2010 at Ketner Lake in Westminster, Colorado, a man reportedly tried to abduct an adult female runner using a chemical on a cloth.