Training through the Narrows

Image

There is an old adage as true today as ever: “Be kind, for everyone is fighting a great battle.”

A great battle in a relatively affluent country is being jostled and pulled in too many directions. We become acquainted with deciding what not to do instead of what to do. As many opportunities morph into ‘needs,’ it seems that some primordial, upstream-salmon gene activates in our brains and bodies, pushing us to grasp for more than we can do.

Many opportunities may knock, and when they do, be on the lookout for Mr. or Ms. Burnout at your door. This solicitor has bad teeth, dark circles under his eyes, a dehydrated look, burning flames of ambition receding in the irises, and a smoky smell – not cigarettes – but the reek of the grinding, engine-melting residue of neglect. For if we are not paying the insurance premium of exercise regularly, and descending from healthy habits because of it, succeed as we might elsewhere, we may not be around long enough to enjoy it.

One way to guard against a visit from this phantom of temptation is to adapt to it by physically training during his visit. This ends-justify-the-means ghost grasps at the wheedling, whining frustration of our unfinished goals; our haunting imperfections. It would ride them as your horses, pulling you and your life behind, clinging to uncertain ropes.

Imagine yourself answering the door as he or she knocks, earnestly beseeching you to listen and pointing to the pale horse out front; asking you to get behind this high-functioning stressor.

And you answer wearing your running shoes, shorts, and t-shirt. You tell the ghost you are going for a run, and you would love to listen to the pitch along your running route. As you establish your cadence on the asphalt, on the trail, and through the physical world of sunshine, air, seasonal scents, and sweat, you notice that he is having a very hard time keeping up. It seems you have come down to earth, and by doing so, entered a state of peace that cooled and moistened your brow, eased your mind, and helped you find your heart. Gratitude for what you have dawns in your heart, and you realize how much better you could devote yourself to what you have.

What is most important? Your run gives you a real opportunity to meditate on that. As you let the run go through your body, making you stronger, you let your mind drift over the topography of your life, and realize what are the tectonics, the foundations of your peaks and troughs. Soon you can distinguish between what is wise for you and what is not. You have outrun the pressure sell.

And that is a mighty fine pace for anyone to make.

Saturday V.VI miles Running with Horses

laugh it up buddy

laugh it up buddy

With subtle rises and downhills, fenced horse ranch properties, and long, quiet country lanes, I enjoyed this first mid-range (for me) run on my new Altra Torins. I was looking for any unusual feedback from feet, ankles, knees, and back with the new shoes. Turns out the only feedback I get is from one of the horses I run by in these parts.

When I ran alongside two beautiful brown horses, one trotted alongside, and I am almost sure this horse was on the edge of laughing at me. I’ve heard whinnying and that wasn’t what this horse was doing. And that smile, the one that says, “how can anything go that slow and sound like it’s running?”

I said, “Well, of course. You’re a big beautiful horse, built for running. You must think my pace is a hoot.”¬†At that point, I was glad that this was not Mr. Ed.

Once out of view of the horses, I finished my run with dignity, working on a more efficient form. I had put a full water bladder on my back initially planning to run much longer, and that threw me off a bit.

I am planning to put in a sprint interval next time I run by that fence with those two smart ass horses.