Practical Training Takeaway: About Workout Books and Swimming for Core with Cardio-Respiratory and Recovery Benefits Included

When I bought the book by fellow blogger and authors Reeves, Paglini, et al. Triathletes Swim First: 100+ Beginning Swim Workouts for Triathletes, I had planned at first to buy a hard copy.

I changed my mind and downloaded the e-book instead. The reason: I use the book by these athletes for one of many options to train the core muscles, and for mobility training of all muscle groups with cardio, breathing, recovery, and buoyancy benefits included.

Takeway Training Tip: With the book on my desktop, I can print-off one of the workouts from one or more pages, and bring it with me to the pool for guidance.

This is also true for all of those fitness, training, and health books that tend to get lost on your bookshelves with workouts, pictorial how-to sequences, and instructive tips in them. If you buy them in e-book form, you can easily print-off the pages with the content you want to work on, and take them with you.

You can even laminate them, create a card folio, and re-use them to save paper, and increase your fluency in variety training.

This is very much a simple way to put all of those sport, training, and fitness books to good use in your adaptive training life.

It also helps the athlete or wellness author to sell an e-book instead of a hard copy, as there is less production expense. Here, the green of the trees and the green of author profits come together.

February Flight Scenes on Sunday Family Walk

When we have trained a lot two days in a row, and want to push it, sometimes we need to take advantage of something I call “active patience.” If you need recovery time from arduous training, but don’t want to take that time, then walk with your family, friends, or solo if that is your recharge inspiration.

You’re still active, staying mobile, and improving your recovery experience.

Tensing and Releasing

Go for the flow.

Go for the flow.

Many know the relaxation technique of tensing the body’s muscles, head to toe, and releasing them, in a wavelike sequence.

It is a great relaxation technique, yet it is also a superb warming-mobility approach as well. As you well may know, static stretching of muscles without warming up, is now out.

Tensing muscles even more in their tighter states of unreadiness (i.e. when you feel tension binding your body, movement, and coordination), will bring the warming blood flow increase to the targeted muscle or muscle group. Relaxing then, the muscles loosen. Progressively, tensing again, and releasing tension again, brings yet more looseness and pliability to the muscles.

A good example to illustrate is that of leaning over to touch our toes, and stopping at the point of felt-tightness, hanging there a few moments. Feet are flat on the ground. From the ground, from feet through the lower back, including all hip girdle muscles, we tense all of our muscles that we can and hold that tension a few seconds. Then we release. We should then feel our fingertips and entire upper body descend more easily from the waist toward the ground, feeling a bit looser. Repeat the process and see how low you can go.

Remember to breathe, either exhaling or inhaling during tension and the opposite during release, and keep that going. Shake out your body when done.

If you feel dizzy doing this, touch or grab a fixture for balance and slowly recover the upright position. An alternative is to touch the ground, and if loose enough to sit down, sit down and rest until the dizziness is over. If the dizziness is major, you feel you are going to faint or blackout, or if you repeatedly get dizzy doing this, stop exercise and schedule a physical with your doctor and tell your doctor about your experience.

Otherwise, think of the many formerly static stretches you used to do by warming up more generally, and add this specific and gradual tensing, releasing, extending, and repeating process to build flexibility, pliability, utility, and strength in the many, many supporting and dynamic muscles of the body.

Country Road Take Me Home, OR Five.Oh.2 after Week of Adaptive Immune System Training

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Ran the fine country and ranch roads of Northern Colorado in the cool, sunshiney air and logged 5.02 miles.

The run felt humble in phases, especially during intervals in which I stepped up my pace, however, finishing I felt immediately better and recovered quickly. I think this bug is about gone.

You know how it is when you think it’s gone, you’re trying to tell someone something, and the mere intake of air to speak draws a cough, and you feel like your 400 years old because of it. Still, it didn’t make me feel like staying home today and eating gobs of hot salsa with chips and drinking 400 gallons of water.

Yesterday, though, it did make me feel like eating medium hot Thai fried rice, a veggie spring roll, and a pot of hot green tea. Later, invited out yet again, dinner involved Miso soup and a small flask of hot sake. These are comforting substances at the end of a virus.

Also comforting was letting garlic flakes sit on the back of my tongue, and sort of marinate and waft through the upper respiratory tract with the believed knowledge that garlic is a natural antibiotic. Anecdotally I felt less inflammation around the cough zone in my throat after trying that.

I think we both know you’ve heard enough. I’m just glad you stop by from time to time. It’s a privilege for this writer.

Coalton Trail

After the seasonal bug from Hades ran through our house for a couple of weeks, this was my return to above ground on Saturday:

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The mountain bikers saw one of four of us hiking this foothill trail, my circuit being an hour and twenty minutes.

Went off trail to see where adjoining ranchers left horse hoof prints along the fence lines, and rusty barrels for target practice.

When our house had “gone viral” my training was solely slow muscle movement training, static hold muscle training, and range-of-motion.

To My CrossFit Friends: Try Adaptive Training for the Long Haul

Adaptive training is sustainable, body-wise, and freer compared to many manifestations of CrossFit. CrossFit has gems to offer, but I believe they were borrowed gems. Those gems were adopted from elsewhere and combined in a “Box,” or a “crucible.” The toughest gems came from elite forces training, that is, combat training. Do or die training. Still, part of military training, even elite military training, is readiness. And readiness involves recovery, and non-injury. If you’re injured, you’re not ready. If you don’t recover properly, injury risk spikes.

For some that may have temporary appeal, especially to younger people. Yet younger people lack experience, and seldom see conflicts of interest in business models that target them. Young people often appear non-conformist…all at the same time in the same way. It is a vulnerable time. And some people are lonely. Lonely as hell. The comradeship they lack they may seek in an intense, physical, shared experience. For that reason, they are less likely to see those conflicts of interest lurking.

Let’s think outside the Box a bit. What is a healthy versus unhealthy gift of individual power to a culture or authority for mind-body training? Some CrossFit groups may dial-in a healthy balance in their approach, especially after recent controversy. On the other hand, there are the other reports:

Getting Fit Even If It Kills You

CrossFit’s Dirty Little Secret

Idea Fit Discussion

Navy Times

How CrossFit Forges Elite Failure

And you can Google the rest of the negatives, of which there are many.

On the other hand, you will also find the positives and Google them too. Any CrossFit member or gym owner will be more than happy to tell you the positives. Yet others will say if you aren’t committed, they don’t want you. And I’d say you should be ready to respond with a laugh at that manipulation game. Just remember, not every useful wonder of chemistry is good to mix at the same time. You can get hurt or die from the ensuing explosion or gaseous poisoning. True it is also of training. Excesses are not consistent with durable endurance or sustainable fitness, and therefore excesses in training are not always consistent with readiness.

Military, sport, art, and work readiness is about fitness and conditioning, but training isn’t about getting injured, it is about proofing against it when the real thing trained for is going on. Studies in stress inoculation make it just as much about mindset, adaptive sleeping, recovery, and rewiring after traumatic experiences. The stresses are measured and periodized by time of exposure and response during training. Check out this summary of researched-supported points in the work of Lt. Col. David Grossman, specifically:

Section three describes the mental attitude necessary to be a warrior. The book goes into greater detail about stress inoculation and its importance to effective, realistic training. There are also some important training principles outlined.

Principle 1: Never “Kill” a Warrior in Training. Learners are expected to complete a scenario even if hit, stabbed or shot. As a trainer, tell them, “You’re not dead until I tell you you’re dead!” Don’t give up, always win.

Principle 2: Try to Never Send a Loser off Your Training Site. Have your participants go through a scenario as many times as necessary in order to have them succeed. Scenarios designed to make the trainee look foolish or fail just prove that the training designers are jerks.

Principle 3: As a Trainer, Never Talk Trash about Your Students. Don’t ridicule or try to tell funny stories about the last trainee who tried to complete your scenario. Your role as a trainer/leader is not only to pass along knowledge but also to inspire. You cannot do this when you are not respected. If criticism is to be given, give it in private. If praise is warranted, do so publicly.

I’m sure this could include: don’t give Rhapdo to your trainees. Don’t injure your troops in training so they are disabled for the real fight.

But are you training for combat? It is as much about mindset, and handling what your body does. Listen:

LTC David Grossman interview.

So to some extent CrossFit, run by those who are trained coaches, can achieve some of these training goals. Yet not everyone is training to be a warrior any more than every tool in a toolbox is a hammer. However, even military training leaves boot camp behind and graduates into a more sophisticated, measured, and periodized experience over time. It mixes individual control with leadership. Most individual civilians who are training for combat don’t have the rest of the training. They are not warriors per-se, but want to be ready for what this society teaches them to fear — which is about everything. Which begs the question: should training be motivated by fear? Or should training be inspired by the commitment to master fear?

For now, let’s discuss.

Adaptive Labor as Training: Aid to Martin Acres subdivision of Boulder

For two and a half hours this morning I had the opportunity to work on flood remediation efforts with some wonderful people volunteering with DonateBoulder.org. We worked in the Martin Acres subdivision.

For those who are medically cleared for this kind of work, I highly encourage volunteer physical labor for those who cannot do it themselves, or who are overwhelmed.

Among the training benefits are asymmetric muscle work, pulling, lifting, carrying, hacking, breaking, dragging, stacking, leveraging, maneuvering, prying, throwing, and tossing. Working with tools with your hands is a bonus, as hand tools benefit your connective tissues and fine motor muscles in ways merely lifting weights cannot.

The best thing about training this way is that you get to work with some special people: other volunteers. You get to help someone in difficult circumstances. And, you help free up another wave of volunteers for the next effort by knocking one out.

You may only have a morning to work, or a whole day. We all have different obligations and time sensitive items any given day. Yet if you put in what you can, and others do too, this expedites humane relief and mitigation of adverse health conditions.

The must have tools and qualities: (1) mask that filters out airborne dust, molds, and noxious building materials such as asbestos; (2) tools for pulling up baseboards and tearing out sodden drywall, i.e. crowbars, wood chisels, hammers, dustpans, shovels, brooms; (3) approved anti-mold and mildew spray product; (4) first aid kit; and (5) safety sense.

Volunteering, like group training, builds camaraderie, dispels loneliness, and strengthens community. Those intangible fringe benefits are as valuable as the physical mission and physical training benefit. Yet the training benefit also helps give the person helped a better feeling that someone is helping them, yet getting something out of it.

That is all true of course, so long as volunteers take the necessary safety precautions, such as an updated tetanus shot and the equipment listed above.

Short on Time Blocs: 2-Run or not 2-Run? Do a Double Day

You awaken with enough time one morning to run a short run but want to run longer. Your calendar balks.

Should you run 2-runs today? One early, and one later to experience that longer endurance experience, and add some mileage to your body’s training base?

If you are cleared to run for fitness and sport, why not, so long as you are not over-training in the larger context of your training days.

This piece at Runner’s World goes into some detail about the benefits of “doubling.” And Jeff Galloway chimes in here.

And this is not only true for running. Other training modes may be mixed, matched, and doubled. Again, don’t over-train, but do adapt and excel. The experience boosts training and performance confidence, in part because few people make room to train twice in a day, or few seize the intervals as discussed in the ‘Interval Farming’ chapter in Farm Your Training Day.

Write in, comment, or, write a guest piece for my blog about how you leverage a “daily double” into your training life from time to time. Thanks for dropping in!

 

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Early

and

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Later on…

Combatting Loneliness By Training Life

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Loneliness does not discriminate. Probably everyone knows what kind of life events, states of being, and physical burdens correlate with it. Whatever isolation and loneliness comes from, those who suffer from it know why solitary confinement is one of the worst punishments prisons dole out.

A training life can move you out of the lonely place into a new life.

Growing your own training life from the ground up will lead you into short, manageable social interactions that begin slowly and gently to drain away the loneliness with each outing. You’ll have time to think, to hold problems up to the sun in your mind and heart, and to subject them to the light that dawns as you move.

The sunshine can boost you up some more.

Start simple: a walk or hike. Go to a nearby running track, a trail you know, or a park with long sidewalk pathways along a lake or river. Or just make the city blocks in a familiar area your training scape.

It is training, and retraining your brain, nerves, muscles, and body chemistry simply to get out and move in the outdoors. So much happens when you do this, there is an automatic element to outdoor outings.

Dress in what’s comfortable, do what you need to do to feel comfortable to get out the door. Then soak up the world’s outdoor riches as you journey.

Overview and Table of Contents: Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

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Overview and Preview as Seen at iBookstore, Lulu.com, Barnes and Noble, and Amazon (with some formatting changes here).
Overview
Adaptive fitness doesn’t revolve around someone else’s contract, facility, and schedule.

With this guide, you can take ownership of your physical training life and leave behind co-dependence on unsustainable, packaged dieting and fitness hype.

Here you will learn ten principles to help you rewire yourself to train adaptively, more consistently, and thoroughly. Seven training dimensions encourage you to train often, in more places, with more choices.

Table of Contents

Introduction ………………………………………………………………………. vii
Organization, Content, and Safety Notice ………………………………..ix

Part I. Principles of Adaptive Training ………………… 1

Chapter 1. The Training Day Principle ……………………………………3
Chapter 2. Interval Farming Principle ……………………………………..7
Chapter 3. Adaptive Journal Principle ……………………………………40
Chapter 4. The Working Principle ………………………………………..45
Chapter 5. The Gradualism Principle …………………………………….60
Chapter 6. Windfall Principle ………………………………………………71
Chapter 7. Attunement Principle …………………………………………. 74
Chapter 8. Adaptive Eating, Drinking, and Sleeping Principles….90
Chapter 9. Objective Principle: Identify & Excel in Your Sport,
Art, and Work …………………………………………………. 107
Chapter 10. Navigation Principle …………………………………………. 111

Part II. The Seven Dimensions  of Adaptive Training …127

Chapter 11. Dimension One: Muscle …………………………………….130
Chapter 12. Mileage ………………………………………………………….. 155
Chapter 13. Mobility …………………………………………………………. 173
Chapter 14. Midsection + Core …………………………………………… 183
Chapter 15. Mountain ……………………………………………………….. 192
Chapter 16. Movement with Forces (MWF) …………………………..206
Chapter 17. The Seventh Dimension: Mind-Body Training via
Sport, Art, Work ………………………………………………254

Acknowledgements

The Reset

Let the Reset happen. Your mind lets go of the intractables, puts them back into your heart, where the mysterious storms, the lightening, the oceanic forces of the Source break them up and produce a path forward for you.

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Fueling, Hydration, and Management of Forces Training Dimension: Follow-Up Post

surivivor of heat

Policy on Heat Injury: Prevention, Early Detection of precursors, Awareness, Quick Response. If it happens to you once, as it did to me 21 years ago, you will want to adopt another policy. No Repeats! Adaptive Training has 7 dimensions, and one of them is Forces Training. Forces Training is about intentionally encountering the natural forces, physics, energies, and elements of our training, sport, art, or work environments under controlled conditions for the purpose of acclimation, adaptation, increased capacity, and performance.

This post follows up on the last post, “When a Run Is Not a Run,” thanks to a question from Simone, whose blog is at http://meltdowntoironman.com/ and whose training targets the 2014 IMOZ or Iron Man Down Under. I was laughing as I wrote this because I’m betting Simone knows more about this than I do, but here is my expanded answer anyway. Anyone have wisdom to add? Please chime in.

There are excellent multi-sport resources for fueling and hydration. I’m posting those below. After that, I post my own suggested lessons-learned from the summer weight-bearing running and hiking perspective.

Professional Multi-Sport Fueling:

Master Race Day Nutrition:
http://www.ironman.com/triathlon-news/articles/2013/06/race-day-fueling.aspx#axzz2aAEqlXGN

How the Pros Hydrated At The Hawaii Iron Man:
http://triathlon.competitor.com/2011/10/nutrition/how-the-pros-hydrated-at-the-hawaii-ironman_41584

Fueling for Open Water Swimming (underlying science & practical detail included by USA Swimming):
http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/b9df2f1a-cf51-411d-b50d-76aaae75b9ae/Nutrition%20Strategies%20for%20Open%20Water.pdf

Our fellow WordPressers you may already know have lots of practical posts on the swim:
http://waterbloggedtriathlete.com/

http://owswimming.com/

My running hydration lessons learned:

1. Hydrate with electrolytes;
2. sipping not gulping;
3. steady sipping;
4. steady nutrition bearing in mind your temps, climbs, and humidity as they will impact your calorie burn rate (your thermostat and cooling system needs fuel to work efficiently);
5. seek cooling opportunities during runs, i.e. shade, cool presses, ice to rub on your head, whatever’s legal, efficient, and doesn’t overly distract you;
6. use an SPF rated, moisture wicking hat if allowed;
7. use proven moisture wicking training wear (in my book I cite research that such garments have a micro-wind tunnel effect surrounding the skin);
8. if thirsty, you’re already dehydrated, so sip at first sign your mouth feels dry, and boost frequency;
9. recognize climbs or changes in running surface resistance may boost your need for replacement fluid;
10. Have a plan and method for hydration, fueling, transition and practice / perfect them during training and races;
11. Occasionally train yourself for short intervals without adequate nutrition and hydration in arduous conditions to practice adapting to unexpected circumstances, practice distinguishing signs of trouble in yourself early, and to become a more perceptive self-trainer. KEEP THESE TRAINING SESSIONS SHORTER THAN THE NORMAL TRAINING SESSION — you don’t want “authentic battle damage” in training, BUT you do want to very gradually increase your capacity and tolerance for hardship; unexpected snafus, changes in conditions using intervals. Also practice your remedial counter-measures during these sessions, and gauge their effectiveness, try different salves, etc. WARNING: GET YOUR PHYSICIAN’S CLEARANCE TO TRY THIS, AND TO WHAT EXTENT.
12. If you show symptoms of dehydration (thirst, urine darker than a light yellow) boost your continual sipping of electrolyte fortified fluids, redouble your focus on efficient form in your sport; seek cooling opportunities (shade etc.); and be sure you’re breathing as efficiently as possible. Watch for symptoms of heat injury developing (cramps, exhaustion, or stroke), which may be found here:

http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/survivalist/2013/07/survival-medicine-signs-and-field-treatments-heat-illnesses
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heat-stroke/DS01025/DSECTION=symptoms

There are myriad forces, elements, factors, and related circumstances you may encounter to modify your sport, art, work, race, event, expedition, or training day: heat, cold, wind, rain, humidity, pressure, altitude, lack of shade, UV rays, reflection, water, fire, disaster, weather, lightening, mud, bugs, animals, inclines, navigation errors, forgotten supplies, contaminated supplies, and more.

Adaptive Forces, Movement with Forces, and Management of Forces training intentionally encounters these elements and natural forces in controlled conditions as primary and secondary training factors to reduce their impact on the outcome of your effort, and if possible, to find ways that these can help you become better. A more detailed, long treatment of this customizable training dimension is an entire chapter in my book Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness.

When a Run is Not a Run, But an Encounter with Physical and Energetic Forces and Conditions

Force of Heat

Force of Heat

Yesterday I did not hydrate to prepare for a run.

Yesterday I did not eat much at all.

Yesterday was not a running training day. And although I ran, I did not run.

At the height of the late day heat in the 90’s, in full sun, underfed for the day, and poorly hydrated, I strapped on a hydration system, downed a Gu (Trademarked name) and took off running. I had no distance or pace in mind. It wound up at 4.21 miles.

My sole goal was to encounter heat and full sun while feeling unprepared for my run. I had planned with the Gu shot, and the hydration system, for my own safety net after the halfway point. The Gu shot would kick in after about 20-30 minutes, and I would feel lousy for over half the exercise period.

During the run I purposely ran on several different surfaces, regular and irregular, to do something against my expectations. I ran on river rock, broken granite, asphalt, dirt, deep grass, groomed grass, concrete, and on a few mulch areas. The route was mostly flat with some subtle rises, but it was all in the open sun with no shade until the end stretch.

In the first 30 minutes of this run, I felt very hot. My skin felt hot, my head felt hot, the air felt hot, I was thirsty, and there was very little or no breeze. When I felt a little lightheaded at one point, I recognized it coinciding with that hollowed-out feeling of stomach emptiness during exertion without blood sugar. I slowed down to adapt to the energy drain, reduce heat build-up, yet still keep running by a purely technical definition, no matter how slowly. I began sipping water when I felt lightheaded to make this a training interval, not self-immolation.

When the Gu finally found my bloodstream I felt the boost and picked up my pace. My stomach emptiness eased, and I  found some tree cover for the last half-mile of my encounter with the heat and my own deprivation. I could have become a treehugger for shade.

Did I train? By someone else’s definition, perhaps not. But the definitions I set had to do with addressing obstacles I have run into before in my training life, not adopting someone else’s focus, but my own, in the present moment. By encountering and adapting to:

Heat

Hunger

Thirst

Finishing determination

and

my thoughts and feelings about it all…

..the goal was to train my mind to adapt to all factors and conditions to continue, not quit, and not fall to a heat injury. You see, long ago, I did reach dangerous temperatures while running hills in a 100 degrees-plus, humid, still forests of Virginia wearing pack, boots, helmet, and carrying a rifle. My temperature was 106.4 degrees Fahrenheit before a pugnacious young Staff Sergeant from San Diego pulled me down, and started pouring gallons of water over my head. He saved my life and I’ll always be indebted.

I do not recommend anyone else do this particular heat / hunger / thirst forces session. Perhaps you would never feel the need. I recommend training on full hydration; after adequate nutrition; being judicious about training times and types given your own personal, physical history, profile, needs, and objectives. In other words, a run is a run, a training run is a training run, but your intention in training, your focus can change the interval into something else.

For me, this was voluntarily facing a convergence of forces to train to adapt to them despite having fallen to them in the past. The purpose? To gradually increase capacity to deal should unexpectedly arduous conditions be imposed on me at some future time. Next time, I’ll go slightly further, and so on under similar conditions. This also trains mind and body to appreciate and stay aware of hydration, nutrition, and preparation. It also helps train my mind to adapt and function when those elements are lacking — to push the envelope back and retrain my body’s capacity to adapt, endure, and do so functionally.

Had I wanted to enjoy the feelings of a “run in the heat” I would have prepared properly for it and billed it as a run. A run it was not. A forces training day it was. So if you are a runner, always prepare. Always adapt with as much preparation as possible. You will train longer, with fewer interruptions, and less wear and tear on the body with excellent preparation.

Think of the many times you have said or read about someone having a “bad day” training. A low energy day. Preparation would likely solve a healthy percentage of those days. Adaptation, a survival and enhancement skill, is the follow-up to preparation when unpredictable things happen.

Train prepared friends!

Mother Teresa: Personal Trainer

What? This:

By internal and external silence, we may bypass barriers, snags, and diversions from purer, more efficient training, study, and accomplishment.

How often does inner or outer chatter delay movement, and this delay, like gum on our shoes seems to swallow time.

I take this inspiration from my a current book in my reading list, entitled, “No Greater Love,” by the late Mother Teresa, a saint.

 

She also wrote that you can’t learn humility by reading about humility. Only by undergoing humiliations (which are guaranteed throughout our lives) do we learn humility. I wonder if typos are included?!

Angela’s Promise

Angela's Promise

That’s what I’m calling this one. Click on the photo to read her latest update. She’s a fellow WordPresser to all here whose ultra running blog Run Nature and reflective blog Mind Margins inspire many. She also happens to have taken the gloves off to fight with cancer at present, and I encourage everyone sharing community here to visit her blog and sound off their support and heartfelt encouragement for ultimate victory and much peace and goodness despite the hardship she is shouldering with a smile every day.

Cancer: And So the Story Begins

Throw down prayers, good thoughts, and messages of love to Angela whose great blog I reblog…

Mind Margins

I am one of those people who probably tells more than they should. If I were a celebrity the tabloids would love me. I can be brutally honest, and I don’t care much what others think of how I live my life.

Last week something happened to me, something you might consider a “life changing event.” I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

This is my story. It’s long, so I’ll be telling it in segments. And stay tuned. Despite the inevitable ending (the same ending you will have one day as well, my friend), I plan on being around for a long time:

5/29/13, Wednesday: THE BEGINNING

I turned over in bed and felt a sharp twinge of pain in my abdomen. It was Tuesday morning. It was as simple as that.

I got up, ate an early lunch, and felt nothing the rest of the day.

The next morning…

View original post 1,379 more words

Simple Personal Executive Power

There is more than meets the eye here.

Consider all of the decisions, words, or actions we may have used this beautiful button on had it popped-up in real time.

From a self-training perspective, this button could cut-off decisions to eat, drink, think, do, or say things that would waste our health, damage our bodies, or steal time from more important priorities, be it relationship, work, physical training, or others. In a limited life span here on Earth, such a button pushed at the right times could save exponential time. That saved time could then find spot-on opportunities for excellence.

This is not just because of better opportunities found, but because we avoid entanglements that would steal yet more time from the most important things.

The cancel button in the picture is blue, a color that suggests that it is perfectly OK to cancel something. To make it red creates negative emotional associations.

Perhaps the “Send” button should be red, as impulsively or accidentally sent messages burn more bridges than cancelling messages does.

Offering a Book Discount in Honor of my Fellow WordPressers

Feel free to check it out! Use the link below:

Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

Now Available at Lulu.com: Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

It’s official. Click on the book cover icon at the upper right side of this screen, and you can go there. The E-book will be available in about one week. For now, it is print on demand, with some extra cost of production. I tried to set as reasonable a print price as possible considering all factors. You can also click here:

Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

Coming May 31st: Available in Lulu.com outlets including B&N, I-Books, and more

Farm Your Training Day: An American Dream of Sustainable Personal Fitness

Ten principles and seven dimensions of adaptive training, conditioning, and mental training for sport, arts, and work.

Farm Your Training Day contains ten principles and seven dimensions of adaptive training, conditioning, and mental training for sport, physical arts, and work. Available through Lulu.com outlets by the end of May 2013. Please link your family, friends, acquaintances, networks, and anyone you believe may benefit from sustainable fitness principles and applications toward a fulfilling training life, for life.

May your Memorial Day weekend be peaceful as you reflect on our fallen who have kept the peace for so many generations.