Adaptive Journaling

Adaptive Journaling is a good return topic for someone who let a blog sit for three  years.

Miss all here who kept tabs on each other’s blogs on sport, conditioning, and outdoors. Hope all are flourishing wherever you are.

Well, FYTD’s Chapter 3 is titled “Adaptive Journal Principle,” and is about keeping our physical conditioning lives alive in the imagination, not just in executive functioning.

My own journaling had become very “executive” these past few years — still using it — a graph paper formatted workbook approach to chronicling what I do as I do  it. The little squares nicely recording the number of miles, reps, seconds, minutes, or whatever unit of action, performance, or time best describes my conditioning on any given day.

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Still, the freedom and reflection of prose was missing.

Like most, my work life is something completely different than this blog topic and my book. Writing FYTD was about contributing to the solution of a major problem and certifying-up to be qualified to do so. I was happy enough that this adaptive conditioning path has stayed with me and hoped it would be a timeless book for self-led fitness and athleticism.

Then earlier this year, companies began calling me to partner with them to promote the book to publishers. I just ignored them, believing they were just middle-men trying to skim cash off the self-published.

Got me thinking though. If it can help others, maybe it is time to promote the philosophy of FYTD, a.k.a. adaptive training as published in 2013 and designed to be timeless.

38 Special Fix for the Loop Flop: Compelled to Obsess, Obsessed to Compel

Forbes entrepreneur blogger Eric Schiffer writes about breaking free of obsessions to reach goals, here.

Obsessing focuses not on what you are doing or even what you want, but on ill-timed imperatives. To set a summit goal then obsess on each stepping stone will tire out the best of ascendants, leaving them on the mountain in the dark, taking forever.

Focus and obsession aren’t the same thing. Focus sees something as it really is in its context. Obsession loses track of what something actually is in favor of processing it, and fears that if it isn’t done now, the sky will fall. Too much tension blows energy, forgets priorities, and trends in error.

A good way to memorize this principle is by singing to yourself the following 38 Special song, or at least the lyrics:

Fitness that adapts stays with you.

Best,

Mike