the inner game and self-allowance

giving the self-critic the job of helping, not hindering our working, functioning self

New possibilities arise when our egoistic self-critic is retrained to help our working self.

you can
you always could

The classics The Inner Game of Tennis and The Inner Game of Golfboth by Timothy Gallwey, address one of the most tender topics for every one of us. The part of our egos that self-protect when we are overcoming a weakness or attempting something that is challenging for us. Gallwey does a great job describing how this ego-self emerged in his tennis students to stymie their progress and pressure them to quit.

These books are on my shelf as long term references. I’ve read what applies to all sports and did not detail the tennis or golf aspects. I’m not a tennis player or golfer, but I’ve played both, enough to understand the phenomenon specified in the book. My key goal, however, was to see how the book applies to other sports, arts and work tasks. You can apply the lessons learned there to any task in sport, art and work, or any sub-task. Perhaps the lessons apply even to our communications with others, or our personality print on any given situation.

Think of the things you quit that you would still like to learn, become proficient in, or even master. Think of the the next thing you need to get better at. Think of new possibilities for you if you were able to tame your inner mind during the learning process. This is about precision, efficiency, economy and becoming a smarter performer so that your work goes much further on your behalf. The upshot of all of this includes having more fun at what you’re doing even in the challenging areas for you.

I’m not going to take credit for these insights, but I’ll refer you to the source. The books are at major book sellers online and likely in some used bookstores. You won’t find mine there, though.

It is my purpose to make the M7 Adaptive Fitness Guidebook one of those reference books that you want to keep on your virtual bookshelf. If you’ve read the books or if you read them in the future, feel free to comment on your experiences implementing the principles.

Cheers!

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